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Today’s Events

  • Feb 7
    Chris Topper, Micah Krock, Chris Pothier Feb 07 to Mar 30 @Steel Door Gallery
  • Feb 7
    Abstract Showcase Feb 07 to Mar 31 @Gallery 903
  • Feb 7
    John David Forsgren, Julia Mangold Feb 07 to Mar 30 @Elizabeth Leach Gallery
  • Feb 27
    Rumors by Small Talk Collective Feb 27 to Apr 28 @Wolff Gallery
  • Feb 28
    Karen Thurman, Claire Browne, Jikai Golan Feb 28 to Mar 24 @Guardino Gallery
  • Mar 1
    Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain Mar 01 to Apr 15 @High Desert Museum
  • Mar 1
    A Touch Of Green Mar 01 to Mar 31 @Attic Gallery
  • Mar 1
    Spectrum Mar 01 to Mar 31 @Eutectic Gallery
  • Mar 1
    Night Gallery Mar 01 to Mar 29 @Splendorporium
  • Mar 2
    The Art of Being Young Mar 02 to Mar 30 @Steel Door Gallery

If Only We’d Known

5 Artists Reveal What They Wish They’d Known Before They Joined the Art Biz

Many of us would have made different decisions in life had we only known more way back when. Then again, maybe we’re glad we didn’t know how hard it was to be an artist, a parent or a world traveler, because we might have stayed home in bed with the covers over our heads. This month, five UAN artists muse on what they wish they’d known before joining the art business. 

 

Michelle Purvis, painter: To stick to one thing. I have invested so much money on projects that have nothing to do with painting but I am a painter. I should stick to painting and let the seamstresses and metal workers make their own beautiful art!

Joe Forbish, metal artist: Don't do it. It sucks. You take a passion and turn it into a career. It can burn you out very fast from doing what you once loved. Flip side is that if you can keep at it, it can be a very rewarding decision.


Kent Forrester, wood artist: How hard it is to make a buck.

Trish Randall, painter: What I wish I'd known when I first started making and selling art is one, that it would take over large portions of my house; and two, that setting up my own flower garden would be such a great source of inspiration for painting (I would have planted it sooner).

Mauricio Romano, jewelry maker: The curve of learning for an artist can be tough. However, we all have to pay our dues. Once you do that it's a matter of starting to raise the bar. To market our art can be really challenging, even when the art could be the best. I guess if you would've known the answers, it could have lost its joy... kind of like already knowing what's inside the box before you open the present.

—By Teresa Bergen